A 2014 report issued by the CDC showed that 399 people died in crashes involving a drunk driver between 2003 and 2012 in New Hampshire. In spite of this number, the state had a surprisingly low death rate compared to the national average.

In fact, New Hampshire had no death rates related to drink driving for people between the ages of 0 to 34 at that time. Meanwhile, the national average for 0 to 20 and 21 to 34 were 1.3 and 6.7, respectively. Men also fared far worse than women. New Hampshire women had no death rates related to this, compared to a national average of 1.5. In contrast, men stood at 4.1, compared to a national average of 5.2.

Researchers partly accounted for the lower death rate by the drunk driving percentages. The national average for adults who reported that they drove after drinking too much was 1.9%. In New Hampshire, that number was just 1.4%. In spite of what many states would consider a phenomenal report, New Hampshire continued to work toward safer roads for all.

Unfortunately, CBS Boston reports that those strategies are no longer working. The state has seen an 82% increase in DWIs. According to a quarterly report released by the police chief, DWIs climbed from 66 at the same time in 2018 to 120 in 2019. In fact, the numbers have steadily risen in the Granite State over the past five years, though death rates remain comparatively low.

The police officers believe restaurants and bars are partially to blame for over-serving customers. They have reportedly issued several warnings regarding this. However, when it comes to enforcing DWI laws, it seems that drivers will remain their main focus. Police officers plan to strengthen enforcement efforts to increase road safety.